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Trade and Regulation Policy Group

Trade and Regulation Policy Group - Short Academic Courses and Seminars

Current courses

Previous courses

If external funding becomes available, these courses may be offered this year

  • Tools for Trade Policy Analysis, 2004
  • Advanced Workshop on Economy-Wide Modelling, 2004
  • An Introductory course on Computable General Equilibrium Modelling, 2003/04

Introduction to Economy-wide Policy Impact Analysis (4-8 April 2005 - Gauteng)

 Most economics courses focus either on macroeconomic relationships or on their micro foundations. However, at the practical level of public sector policy analysts and policy makers, considerable attention is paid to the industry/sector or meso level of economic activity. Key sector analysis, sectoral impact studies, partial and general equilibrium trade and industry analysis are frequently conducted both in the public and the private sector.

Input-output analysis, complemented by means of social accounting matrices is often used as a tool to conduct such meso-level economic enquiry. Researchers frequently use these tools to analyse the impact of policy-related and other changes on the economy. The tools are also extended to address broader concerns, such as the impact of policy on the environment. Economic modelling techniques that capture economy-wide impacts of policy changes are increasingly being used in South African academic, consulting and research circles. To cater for this increased demand, the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town in conjunction with the Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies (TIPS) are offering the fifth one week introductory course in economy-wide policy impact analysis at the end of March or the beginning of April 2004.

The course is designed and presented by academics and experts in the field of economy-wide policy modelling. Lectures are used to introduce the theory and provide insight into the scope of research possible using the particular modelling technique. More importantly, each lecture is followed by a hands-on exercise where the theory or model is applied using economic data from South Africa and other Southern African countries where appropriate. Apart from imparting the practical skills needed to apply the theory, these exercises familiarise participants with key features of the South African economy. Each participant will also present a brief project using the modelling tools learnt during the course. An afternoon slot will be reserved for guest lectures on real live applications highlighting the usefulness and shortcoming of these techniques.

By the end of the course, participants will be equipped with sufficient theoretical and practical skills to engage in impact analysis within their research, consulting or academic environments. The course also provides a solid grounding for those who wish to enter into the field of computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling. For these participants a CGE modelling course will be offered at a later stage.

Course fees: R4 500 (which includes teas and lunches).

If you wish to be considered for admission to this course, please send your CV to Dirk Ernst van Seventer (dirk@tips.org.za). Closing date for registration is 28 February 2005. Further information on registration, accommodation and required preparation can be obtained from the course conveners: Course Outline, lecture notes and exercises

Click here for more information on the course outline and reading list

Click here to download the material for the 2003 course

Click here for pictures of the 2003 course

Click here for pictures of previous courses

For more information contact:

Dirk Ernst van Seventer

    dirk@tips.org.za

Lawrence Edwards

    Lawrence.Edwards@uct.ac.za

  

Tools for Trade Policy Analysis , December 6-10 2004 Objective of the Course

The objective of this course is to provide researchers and government personnel working in the area of trade with a fundamental understanding of trade policy and the tools used to undertake its analysis. It is not a classic international trade course taught at graduate schools, but rather focused on the practitioner faced with having to brief the minister or trade negotiator on how to respond to trade issues and negotiations that arise. As such, the theory discussions will concentrate not on the rigorous mathematics but rather an intuitive understanding of all the complexities of how trade policy changes affect an economy. It also has a strong emphasis on useful partial equilibrium policy tools that can be used to provide a reasonable assessment of the impact of trade policy changes on the economy (from output to labour to consumers) relatively quickly and with the kind of data that is available in the region.

For further information on previous courses click here.

Advanced Workshop on Economy-Wide Modelling, 7-14 January 2004  Motivation and Background:

The Department of Economics at the University of Cape Town has hosted two short courses annually in policy analysis using economy-wide modeling techniques since 2000. These courses and other efforts have contributed to a growing use of economy-wide models for policy analysis in the southern Africa region. This workshop seeks to build on this existing momentum. The primary goal of the workshop is to augment the skills of current practitioners in the region.

 Format:

The workshop will delve deeply into four topical areas. The study of each topic will likely include: presentation of recent contributions to the literature by instructors as well as current work being undertaken by selected participants, reproduction of results from at least one of the presented papers, a model extension, and in-depth discussion. Possible topic areas include:

  • regional modeling,
  • public finance,
  • analysis of trade agreements,
  • poverty and income distribution implications of policy change,
  • dynamics, and
  • imperfect competition.

 In addition, some practical aspects of conducting research, such as managing data and organizing output, will also be covered.

Instructors:

Channing Arndt, Purdue University Rob Davies Joseph Francois, Erasmus University Scott McDonald, Sheffield University (provisional) Sherman Robinson, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

With assistance from: Lawrence Edwards, University of Cape Town; Christen Lungren, University of Sussex; Dirk van Seventer, Trade and Industrial Policy Stategies; and James Thurlow, University of Natal and IFPRI.

 Contact: Persons interested in participating in the workshop should contact Lawrence Edwards (Lawrence.Edwards@uct.ac.za). A fee will be requested of all participants in order to meet the costs of holding the workshop. Course slots will be strictly limited.

Accommodation:  Accommodation  is notoriously difficult to obtain in January.  A list of available accommodation (including prices) are available from this link. Please book early to avoid disappointment. 

Maps: A map of the UCT campus is available from the following site:  http://www.uct.ac.za/generic.php?m=/contacts/campus.php

An Introductory Course on Computable General Equilibrium Modelling 30 June -11 July 2003 

Whilst most economic course work focuses either on macroeconomic relationships or on their micro foundations, at the practical level of public sector policy analysts and policy makers, considerable attention is paid to the industry or sector level of economic activity. Key sector analysis, sectoral impact studies, partial and general equilibrium trade and industry analysis are frequently conducted both in the public as well as the private sector. 

The use of economic modelling techniques that capture economy-wide impacts of policy changes is growing in the South African academic, consulting and research circles. To cater for this increased demand, the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town in conjunction with International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) are hosting a two week intensive computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling course in Cape Town between 30 June and 11 July 2003. As in previous years, the course is open to suitable candidates from outside of the University of Cape Town. 

The course builds on material designed by IFPRI who have been involved in the development of this course over the past two years. The course combines theory, data, and application, with emphasis on hands-on computer training. In the theory area, it surveys basic micro, macro, and trade theory, all of which are applied in economic models. Other topics dealing with government finance, regulation and environmental economics may also be dealt with. The general equilibrium models developed are structured around Social Accounting Matrices (SAMs) which provide a practical and consistent framework for organising economic data. The course presents this framework and leads students from simple SAM based models to more complex CGE models.

 For economic modelling the course teaches the GAMS programming languages. The different parts of the course are tightly integrated and cumulative - the course moves from the simple to the complex; both theoretical and applied skills developed at earlier stages are drawn upon and further developed at later stages. At each stage extensive computer-based exercises are provided. By the end of the course participants will be competent in the programming and use of standard CGE models. 

 This is a Masters level course and is open to all students with at least an Honours degree containing the requisite background in economic theory and quantitative techniques. A fee will be requested of all participants in order to meet the costs of holding the workshop. Course slots will be strictly limited.

 For further information regarding the course and available accommodation, please contact 

 Lawrence Edwards (Lawrence.Edwards@uct.ac.za) (Tel: 021 650 2723)

Click here for maps of UCT. Lectures will take place Upper Campus in Leslie Commerce Lecture theatre 2B (See grid C3 on map).

Click here for the 2003 course material

Click here for outline of modelling course in 2002.

Click here for pictures of modelling course in 2002.

Click here for pictures of modelling course in 2001.